Environment

Scenes Inside the Shoremont

I took these photos on August 24 inside the deteriorating Shoremont Apartments.

You can see the black mold problem and the overall interior condition of the Shoremont.

Volunteers transform Lewis Park

Lewis Park continues to transform into a Natural Area. Thanks to the volunteers from Seattle Pacific University, Jefferson Park Community Center and Temple Beth Am, invasive plants have been removed and replaced with native shrubs, groundcover and trees.

The Lewis Park Steering Committee was awarded, a Department of Neighborhoods Small and Simple Neighborhood Matching Grant to hire a geotechnical firm to do an analysis of the steep slope areas in Lewis Park. Terra Associates, Inc. conducted a visual site reconnaissance, on-site exploration, and review of all available geologic documentation. Parks and Recreation reviewed the report and will incorporate the results in restoration plans for Lewis Park.

The Neighborhood Matching Grant also paid for 1,400 work hours from Earthcorps and the King County Corrections Work Program.

Volunteers continue to restore the more level areas of Lewis Park each Sunday through November. Gloves, tools, water and light snacks are provided and volunteers can participate any time between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Check out these restoration photos from Forest Steward Dee.

Volunteers continue to transform Lewis Park

Lewis Park continues to transform back into a Natural Area. Thanks to the volunteers from Seattle Pacific University, Jefferson Park Community Center and Temple Beth Am, invasive plants have been removed and replaced with native shrubs, groundcover and trees.

The Lewis Park Steering Committee was awarded,a Department of Neighborhoods Small and Simple Neighborhood Matching Grant to hire a geotechnical firm to do an analysis of the steep slope areas in Lewis Park. Terra Associates, Inc. conducted a visual site reconnaissance, on-site exploration, and review of all available geologic documentation. Parks and Recreation reviewed the report and will incorporate the results in restoration plans for Lewis Park.

The Neighborhood Matching Grant also paid for 1,400 work hours from Earthcorps and the King County Corrections Work Program.

Volunteers continue to restore the more level areas of Lewis Park each Sunday through November. Gloves, tools, water and light snacks are provided and volunteers can participate any time between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Check out these photos of the restoration thanks to Lewis Park Forest Steward Dee.

Orphaned beavers released back into the wild

Tenino has a lot of beavers, especially at the high school. Now, two more are making Tenino their home.

After one year of constant care at the PAWS Wildlife Center in Lynnwood, the two beavers are ready to live on their own.

The beavers first came to PAWS in April, each weighing less than a pound. They had to learn everything from how to swim to how to eat.

This week, wildlife workers drove them 90 miles to Tenino to set them up in an idyllic pond. They're getting a little help in their new neighborhood, moving into a pre-built lodge stocked with their first meals.

Dondi Byrne was the beavers' main caretaker.

"It's pretty exciting," she said after transferring the beavers from a travel carrier into the lodge. "You're just nervous to make this release go well."

After a short wait, she got the payoff. One beaver emerged from the lodge to peek out of the water. It eventually moved around to the back to a shaded spot

Byrne expected the animals to feel safe.